Checkiday.com
Checkiday.com
Checkiday.com

Description

Today celebrates the daisy, also known as the common daisy, lawn daisy, or English daisy. In England it is commonly called a bruisewort, because the crushed leaves were traditionally used to soothe bruised skin. It is part of the Asteraceae family, a family with thousands of varieties. The name "daisy" is derived from an Old English word that means "day's eye," because the petals of daisies open at dawn and close at dusk. Daisies are native to western, central, and northern Europe, and are also now prevalent in the Americas and Australasia. Daisies are often found on lawns, and are considered to be an invasive species, but are also seen as being valuable for ground cover in some garden spaces. They are perennial flowers that usually bloom in early to midsummer. They have a long growing season, and in some places will even produce a few flowers in mild winters. Daisies are composite flowers; they have white petal-like ray florets that come out from the center, and yellow disk florets made of many small flowers that are clustered together in the center. Daisies symbolize purity, innocence, simplicity, virtue, and patience, and are seen as being the flower of children. They are commonly used to make garlands called daisy chains.

Daisy Day is observed next on Monday, January 28th, 2019. It has always been observed annually on January 28th.

How to Observe

If you live in an area where daisies are growing this time of year, go out and try to find some. Enjoy them in nature, or pick some to put in a vase or to make a daisy chain with. You could also put them in a salad or on a sandwich, or use them to make tea. Some people use them for medicinal purposes, which you could learn more about. Make sure to use sayings that use the word "daisy" today. Say "oopsies daisies" or "whoops-a-daisy" when you make a mistake. If something is healthy or full of energy say is is "fresh as a daisy." If you talk about death, make sure to use to phrase "pushing up daisies."

Occurrence Patterns

ObservedFirst YearLast Year
annually on January 28th--

Countdown

Loading...

Hashtags

Related Holidays

Observation Notifications

Would you like to be notified before the next observation? Sign up here to be told when notifications are available!

Something Wrong or Missing?

We would love to hear from you! Please contact us using this form.