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National Weatherperson's Day

National Weatherperson's Day celebrates the science of meteorology, and honors those who work in fields related to meteorology and weather forecasting, who provide Americans with weather, water, and climate forecasts and warning services, to keep people and property safe, and to help people better plan their days. It recognizes those who are members of the National Weather Service (NWS), volunteer spotters and observers, those that work at commercial weather companies, television newscasters, and others.

The local National Weather Service gathers weather data, analyzes it, and issues forecasts and warnings. Over time, improved NWS forecasts have kept more people safe. Marine and aviation forecasts help the economy, and spot forecasts help firefighters control wildfires. More than 11,000 volunteer observers help the NWS by taking measures of data such as temperature and precipitation. About 300,000 volunteer storm spotters give visual reports on extreme weather to forecast offices and local emergency management officials. Commercial weather companies enhance NWS data. Television weathercasters are the most visible face of weather, and the NWS relies on them to relay warnings and watches. Science teachers inspire and encourage students to pursue paths in weather related fields, and research meteorologists come up with new forecast techniques.

The day is celebrated on February 5, because it also commemorates the birthday of John Jeffries, who was born on the date in 1745. He was one of America's first weather observers, having started taking daily weather observations in Boston in 1774. He also took the first weather observation by balloon, doing so in London in 1784. He brought along a thermometer, barometer, and hygrometer up 9,000 feet.

How to Observe

If you know someone in a weather related field, thank them for their work today. If you know any young people, this may be a good day to encourage them to look at meteorology as a career option. You too can help out and become a weatherperson. Why not think about becoming a NWS Cooperative Observer or a storm spotter? The day could also be spent learning more about weather and meteorology by reading books on the subjects. It also is a good day to visit or plan a visit to a weather related museum such as the National Weather Museum.

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