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Description

Miniature Golf Day celebrates the miniaturized version of golf, also known as mini-golf, minigolf, crazy golf, or putt-putt. Miniature golf was invented in the late 19th century in Scotland, likely as a way to allow women to golf, as they weren't supposed to raise their arms above shoulder level. The game focused on putting, which kept arms low.

In the late 19th century the sport crossed the Atlantic, and following World War I it became became very popular in the United States. The Thistle Dhu course opened in North Carolina in 1916, ushering in the era of the standardized miniature golf course. With the invention of an artificial green in 1922, the miniature golf boom started, and lasted until the late 1930's when the Great Depression helped to dampen the popularity of the sport. Improvements in obstacles on the green by the Taylor Brothers and Lomma Brothers in the 1950's may have helped the sport to once again gain popularity.

The game is usually played on AstroTurf, carpet, or concrete. There are regularly nine or eighteen holes, just like in traditional golf. But, unlike traditional golf, there usually is no more than a ten yard distance from tee to cup. The layout of the course is set up in such a way as to many times require bank shots, and there commonly are tunnels, and obstacles—such as windmills—that must be navigated around.

Miniature Golf Day is observed next on Saturday, September 21st, 2019. It has always been observed annually on September 21st.

How to Observe

The day should be spent by playing miniature golf. Go with friends or family to one mini-golf location, or see how many places you can golf at in one day. You could also set up a mini-golf course up in your backyard, with things you find around your house. Use a miniature golf database to find places to golf in your area, and read some reviews of courses. Learn more about mini-golf at the World Minigolf Sport Federation and Minigolf News.

Occurrence Patterns

ObservedFirst YearLast Year
annually on September 21st--

Countdown

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