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Made in the USA Day

Taking place right before another patriotic holiday, Independence Day, Made in the USA Day encourages the manufacturing of goods in the United States and the purchasing of these American-made goods. It celebrates the companies and brands that manufacture their products in the United States, and gives consumers the opportunity to support them. Some sources point to Joel Joseph of the Made in the USA Foundation as the creator of the day, and lists the day as having its start in 1989.

Labels signifying country of origin are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). These labels are required if the product is coming from another country, but only some products made in the United States—including automobiles, furs, textiles, and wool—are required to have the labels. However, many other products are stamped with the labels, which is fine as long as they follow the FTC's Made in the USA policy, which essentially says that in order for there to be a "Made in the USA" stamp on a product, "all or virtually all" of the product must be made in the United States. "Made in the USA" can be expressed with other phrases, such as "American-made," and can also be implied by how a product is advertised, promoted, or otherwise labeled.

Many manufacturers use the Made in the USA stamp as a selling point, as many American consumers view products made in the United States as having a higher quality. Some consumers wish to buy American goods because they are made under the existence of environmental and labor laws, in contrast to the sweatshop conditions of many factories overseas. According to a survey from Ask Your Target Market, most American consumers consider it to be important to buy products with the "Made in the USA" stamp, and about half say they will pay more in order to get an American-made product. Although, most consumers acknowledge that less than half of the products they end up buying are made in America.

How to Observe

Celebrate the day by purchasing products that have been made in the United States. You could also commit to continuing to do so going forward. Another way to celebrate the day could be to explore a website of an organization that helps connect consumers with American-made products, such as the Made in America Company and the Made in the USA Foundation. Watching a documentary film such as Made in the USA: The 30 Day Journey or American Made Movie may be appropriate for the day. If you aren't from America, you could still buy American, or you could purchase something that was made in your country.

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